UNDERSTANDING ATTENTION DEFICIT HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER (ADHD): A VISION OF GESTALT THERAPY IN CHILDREN

TATIANE CONCOLATO COSTA, MARISTELA CANISSO VALESE

Resumo


Introduction: The Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is one of the most common disorders among children, and causes difficulties in their family and social life. According to Antony and Ribeiro the definition of ADHD is common in people with Meanwhile Gestalt therapy is based on diverse theories holistically, formulating that human beings and your environment constitute an entirety that emerge from this interrelation between organism and environment. Literature review: Antony and Ribeiro believe that the child with ADHD, it is demonstrated lost, not knowing what to think or do, since you can not prioritize their needs, so the loss of control of your impulses and their sensory experiences demonstrate that the body is who dominates child. According to Antony and Ribeiro show that the restlessness and inattention show the two extremes of the child with ADHD, as the slowness of thought and speed of perception, the hiperattention and attention deficit the hipermotion and the deficit affectivity, so we can then relate these extremes in language gestaltic the figure over a disorganized background, in which the constant changes of activities as well as the interrupted tasks, continuous gestalten leave open, this leads to a constant dissatisfaction, failing to give meaning that which you see, featuring a disorganized internal world. Conclusion: The child with ADHD lives searching for herself in this attempt ends up guided by feel and act in impulsive and unruly manner. Therefore, Gestalt therapy seeks this holistic view of the child with ADHD, rescuing their own body awareness and a sense for your life, providing accountability and learning for their choices as well as the prioritization of needs, through creative adjustments and self-regulatory the organism.


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